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Black man in #Ferguson to journalist: "Not in Afghanistan, not in Iraq … our problem ain’t with Hamas; it’s right here in the United States of America where you’re shooting us down like dogs and n****s"

See http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/08/13/overkill-images-from-ferguson-protest-show-cops-treating-city-like-a-war-zone

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Just as Muhammad Ali said fifty years ago, the enemy of Black people in the United States cannot be found in any US-labeled “terrorist organizations” overseas, but rather amongst the police, politicians, and white supremacists, right here at home.


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These are the inevitable fruits of war, occupation, and imperialism. The US military has lorded over the people of Afghanistan for over ten years. The Afghan people have every right to fight back against an invading army which has repeatedly committed massacres of Afghan civilians and treats the latter like colonial subjects. Every Afghan individual who has any shred of national pride must feel outraged at having American forces continue to prop up a corrupt, puppet regime which is more accountable to the needs of its U.S. masters than to the actual Afghan population. In fact, the current regime is just as misogynistic and repressive as was the former Taliban government (which was itself originally a creation of the U.S.).

There is only one just solution: End US imperialism and military intervention in Afghanistan and throughout Central Asia and the Middle East.

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For the first time since Vietnam, a United States Army general was killed in an overseas conflict on Tuesday when an Afghan soldier opened fire on senior American officers at a military training academy.

 … scores of these so-called insider attacks have plagued the American military in recent years, and Afghan and American commanders believe the vast majority have been carried out by Afghan soldiers and police alienated and angered by the protracted war in their country, and the corrupt and ineffectual government that the United States has left in place. Few of the attacks are believed to have been the result of coordinated Taliban plots.


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I have a question about Bowe Bergdahl. As usual the 24 news networks give no details beyond how he should be punished for betraying "The America". Could the reason be that he is suffering from combat shock and just wandered off because he was more than a little disturbed by his experiences? But we seem to concerned with persecuting him instead of having him back and helping him.
Anonymous

Here is what a friend of mine wrote about this:

http://dissidentvoice.org/2014/06/deserters-are-heroes/

If Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was a deserter, then he’s a hero. Furthermore, he might have been the only sane American in Afghanistan. That war is not only unnecessary, it is wrong. Bergdahl’s recognition of this fact (if that’s what occurred) proves his sanity. Then again, perhaps he just got tired of killing and the threat of being killed. Or maybe the military’s excessively macho culture got to him. If he did just walk away from his post, it’s clear something cataclysmic happened in his psyche. It is not his fault other soldiers may have been killed searching for him. It is the fault of the government and its supporters that sent the soldiers into war in the first place.


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The “decent Left” was wrong: a blood soaked occupation did not lead to a promising post-Taliban future.

Against the sunny predictions of the cruise missile left, Afghanistan is in ruins. Western bombings in Herat, Farah, and Kunduz have led to mass civilian death, while nighttime house raids murder more intimately in Ghazi Khan and Khatabeh.

The casualty figures should shame the war’s supporters. The Asia Foundation reports that 500,000 Afghans say they were subject to violence from the International Security Assistance Force in 2011 alone. Bob Dreyfuss and Nick Turse of the Nation calculate that even by conservative counts, the deaths of 6481 civilians were directly attributable to ISAF and the Afghan government with which it is allied. Thousands more have been killed by insurgents, fighting a war of the West’s making.


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NPR reports that under Obama, troops in Afghanistan have been “cut by about two-thirds”—without noting that first he tripled them.


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war and occupation - bad for the people of Afghanistan and the U.S. the only people it benefits are war contractors, Karzai and his quisling Afghan cohorts/warlords, and the US ruling class in their desire to extend America’s imperial presence in Central Asia.

war and occupation - bad for the people of Afghanistan and the U.S. the only people it benefits are war contractors, Karzai and his quisling Afghan cohorts/warlords, and the US ruling class in their desire to extend America’s imperial presence in Central Asia.


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LAST NIGHT, President Obama stated that he is “heartbroken” about the shooting on Fort Hood Army base in Killeen, Texas. We, too, are heartbroken, because this shooting could have been prevented.

The United States military is an institution that teaches us to devalue the lives of others and to devalue ourselves. When combat stress and other injuries are added to that environment, the result is volatile.


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[Photo: A “drone shadow” created for the Istanbul Design Biennial. (STML/ Creative Commons/ Flickr)]

UN Official: States Must Not Hide Civilian Drone Deaths

Phyllis Bennis: “This report is the beginning of chipping away at US impunity.”
Increasing drone strikes are causing “disproportionate civilian casualties,” and the U.S. and other states must not be permitted to continue hiding this trail of death from the public, charged a UN official in a recently released report.
In a damning 21-page report, UN special rapporteur on human rights Ben Emmerson identifies 30 drone strikes in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, and Gaza in which civilians were killed, injured, or threatened by drone strikes.
This includes a December 2013 U.S. drone strike on a recent wedding procession in Yemen near the city of Rad’a that left 12 people dead and at least 15 wounded — an attack that the U.S. and Yemeni governments initially claimed had killed “militants.”
While the U.S. is leading the covert drone wars in all of these countries except for Gaza, and is backing that effort, the Obama administration has refused to acknowledge the full extent of the attacks, refused to publicly identify the people killed in drone attacks, and repeated the unverified claim that civilian deaths have been minimal.
Yet, data for 2013 shows that drone strikes in Afghanistan accounted for 40 percent of civilian deaths by pro-government forces, marking a three-fold increase since 2012, the report notes.

[Photo: A “drone shadow” created for the Istanbul Design Biennial. (STML/ Creative Commons/ Flickr)]

Phyllis Bennis: “This report is the beginning of chipping away at US impunity.”

Increasing drone strikes are causing “disproportionate civilian casualties,” and the U.S. and other states must not be permitted to continue hiding this trail of death from the public, charged a UN official in a recently released report.

In a damning 21-page report, UN special rapporteur on human rights Ben Emmerson identifies 30 drone strikes in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, and Gaza in which civilians were killed, injured, or threatened by drone strikes.

This includes a December 2013 U.S. drone strike on a recent wedding procession in Yemen near the city of Rad’a that left 12 people dead and at least 15 wounded — an attack that the U.S. and Yemeni governments initially claimed had killed “militants.”

While the U.S. is leading the covert drone wars in all of these countries except for Gaza, and is backing that effort, the Obama administration has refused to acknowledge the full extent of the attacks, refused to publicly identify the people killed in drone attacks, and repeated the unverified claim that civilian deaths have been minimal.

Yet, data for 2013 shows that drone strikes in Afghanistan accounted for 40 percent of civilian deaths by pro-government forces, marking a three-fold increase since 2012, the report notes.


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And who is holding the US accountable for these war crimes and crimes against humanity?

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The number of civilians killed and wounded in Afghanistan’s war rose 14 percent last year, with nearly 3,000 people dead as violence escalates and the US prepares to withdraw the bulk of its forces.

The United Nation’s annual protection of civilians in armed conflict report, published on Tuesday, documented 2,959 civilian deaths and 5,656 wounded in 2013.

The UN said the figures are the highest since 2009, the worst year since the US invasion of 2001.


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Also see http://socialistworker.org/2013/12/04/operation-enduring-occupation:

"The proposed accord would allow the U.S. to keep up to nine military bases in Afghanistan—and mandate that it fund the Afghan government’s security forces through at least 2024.

"It also allows for the presence of an indefinite number of foreign troops, though Karzai claims the number will be some 15,000 soldiers, the majority of them from the U.S. U.S. troops and contractors working with the Defense Department would be allowed to enter the country without having to obtain passports or visas.

"U.S. troops will be able to engage in combat operations in "mutually agreed" circumstances, including giving support to Afghan forces. Under the agreement, U.S. soldiers are exempt from civil or criminal complaints under Afghan law—jurisdiction will lie solely with the U.S., which has never allowed its own soldiers to face charges in Afghanistan for the killing of Afghan civilians."


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