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Abbie Bakan -  Marxism and indigenous feminism
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Marxism and indigenous feminism
June 26, 2014

Indigenous feminism is a significant current of anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist politics, one from which Marxists have much to learn. In fact, indigenous women have inspired Marxist ideas about women’s liberation for decades, but we often fail to recognize the contribution. Historically, these women and their families were the objects of study of Lewis Henry Morgan, the American colonialist who provoked Marx’s commentary, and who would in turn serve as the experiential basis for Frederick Engels’ Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State. Challenging extreme racism, sexism and violence, indigenous women of North America continue to lead movements from Idle No More to the justice for the Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women in Canada.


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oh snap!
[Rough translation] 
"Tired of the censoring of a natural process, various feminist groups have organized a variety of activities to bring to light the taboo surrounding menstruation."
===

Las feministas que desafiaron el pudor de la menstruación
Cansadas la censura a sus procesos naturales, diversos colectivos de feministas se han organizado para realizar diversas actividades que sacan a la luz el tabú que rodea a la menstruación.

oh snap!

[Rough translation]

"Tired of the censoring of a natural process, various feminist groups have organized a variety of activities to bring to light the taboo surrounding menstruation."

===

Las feministas que desafiaron el pudor de la menstruación

Cansadas la censura a sus procesos naturales, diversos colectivos de feministas se han organizado para realizar diversas actividades que sacan a la luz el tabú que rodea a la menstruación.

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via Tumblr user kristine-claire.

via Tumblr user kristine-claire.


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The New York Times refused to print this comic on “Men’s Rights Activists.”

Some of you may have noticed that David Rees and I have been producing a comic for the New York Times Week in Review section called “See Something, Say Something” every other Sunday… but we’re not in today’s paper. That’s because they objected to David’s script this week and refused to consider printing it… the subject matter (male rage, online bullying & the hashtag #yesallwomen) was “too sensitive.” 
https://michael-kupperman.squarespace.com/kuppermanblahblahblah/2014/6/1/the-comic-not-fit-to-print

The New York Times refused to print this comic on “Men’s Rights Activists.”

Some of you may have noticed that David Rees and I have been producing a comic for the New York Times Week in Review section called “See Something, Say Something” every other Sunday… but we’re not in today’s paper. That’s because they objected to David’s script this week and refused to consider printing it… the subject matter (male rage, online bullying & the hashtag #yesallwomen) was “too sensitive.” 

https://michael-kupperman.squarespace.com/kuppermanblahblahblah/2014/6/1/the-comic-not-fit-to-print


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Boston Feminists for Liberation

Boston Feminists for Liberation


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yeah, see, this is MUCH better than the odious “Real Men Don’t … ” meme favored by politicians and the Hollywood glitterati.
yeah, see, this is MUCH better than the odious “Real Men Don’t … ” meme favored by politicians and the Hollywood glitterati.

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What we are experiencing is the violent but logical conclusion of the decades-long right-wing backlash that arose in the wake of the women’s liberation movement of the 60s and 70s. Especially once the feminist movement gave up on the street protests, mass activist organizations, and bold actions; ever since, the right-wing has been whipping up a misogynist frenzy, trying to blame everything from poverty to the national debt on feminism in particular and  women in general.

I’ve been reading about the period immediately following the passage of the federal amendment granting women the right to vote in 1920. The following two decades saw a strikingly similar backlash arise in the growth of various intellectuals and “activists” fulminating over the evils of “feminism” and “female supremacy”, blaming the women’s suffragists and rights movement for everything from causing the Great Depression to the decline in American culture.

Capitalist inequality and oppression may run through various cycles, with a victory against a particular manifestation of oppression here and there; but the problem is, that victory can always be rolled back and invariably is no sooner won than it is immediately subject to seemingly indefatigable attack from forces of reaction and ignorance. What we need is not just temporary victories, temporary concessions, temporary amelioration of the worst excesses of the system’s oppressiveness; but the utter and definitive conquest and abolition of the prevailing socio-economic order, along with the attendant inequality, exploitation, and oppression which it relies upon and fosters.


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You say not all men are monsters?

Imagine a bowl of M&Ms. 10% of them are poisoned.

Go ahead. Eat a handful.

Not all M&Ms are poison.

- The Frogman nails it. (via wlcometothemyscira)

We know not all men are monsters. But the ones who are make it very difficult to trust the rest when the consequences for doing so can be so dire.

via thefrogman.me —> read more: http://u.pw/1nrWYmA


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When I set out to write the life of Eleanor Marx in 2006 some friends worried that yet again I’d been seduced by an unfashionable and overly abstruse biographical subject. Either that, or they just said: “Who?” A Marx? The mother of socialist feminism? It didn’t sound catchy in our new century.

Yet Eleanor Marx is one of British history’s great heroes. Born in 1855 in a Soho garret to hard up German immigrant exiles, her arrival was initially a disappointment to her father. He wanted a boy. By her first birthday Eleanor had become his favourite. She was nicknamed Tussy, to rhyme, her parents said, with “pussy” not “fussy”. Cats she adored; fussy she wasn’t. She loved Shakespeare, Ibsen, both the Shelleys, good poetry, bad puns and champagne. She would be delighted to know that we can claim her as the first self-avowed champagne socialist.

 … Eleanor went out into the world to put into practice and to test what she’d learned from Marx and Engels. Her quest to go ahead; to live it, soon took her into new worlds: the cultural realms of radical modern theatre, the contemporary novel and the artistic circles of early bohemian Bloomsbury. She was a pioneer of Ibsenism in Britain. She translated Flaubert’s Madame Bovary into English for the first time. She took to the stage herself – with sometimes hilariously misdirected results. She was also her father’s first biographer.

Eleanor was born into a Britain that was not yet an electoral democracy. Working-class men, all women and the poor were prohibited from voting. But Eleanor’s life is one of the most significant and interesting events in the story of British socialism. Not since Mary Wollstonecraft had any individual made such a profound, revolutionary contribution to political thought – and action.


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This is Harvard University’s idea of a “feminist” discussion. Having the most unrepresentative cross-section of elite American women speak about their experiences ruling over the world. Nevermind that the vast majority of women in the U.S. have most likely had their lives made miserable by precisely these “powerful women.” Goldman Sachs executives, Homeland Security operatives, New York Times editors — it’s a veritable menagerie of evil-doers!

Yes, it’s true, a tiny minority of women have made their way into the upper circle of power. And now they too have the privilege of administering the oppression, exploitation, and subjugation which afflicts the majority of this society’s population, male and female.

Real women’s liberation means overturning the class inequality and oppressive divisions which capitalist society depends upon; not merely putting the control of the status quo, capitalist society, in the hands of an infinitesimal number of ruling class women.

===

Office of the President


Dear Members of the Harvard Community,

President Drew Faust invites you to join her in Sanders Theatre on Monday, April 7, at 4:00 p.m. for a panel discussion entitled “When Women Lead: Insights and Experience from Women in Power.”

Four distinguished women leaders will consider the changing roles of women in business, education, and politics, as well as the challenges and opportunities facing women in positions of authority. Karen Gordon Mills, A.B. ’75, M.B.A. ’77, former Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration, and Senior Fellow at the Harvard Business School and the Harvard Kennedy School, will moderate the discussion. Jill Abramson, A.B. ’76, Executive Editor of the New York Times; Edith Cooper, A.B. ’83, Executive Vice President and Global Head of Human Capital Management at Goldman Sachs; and Janet Napolitano, President of the University of California and former Secretary of Homeland Security, will serve as panelists. Questions from the audience will be welcomed following their conversation.

Tickets will be provided at the door until capacity is reached. Please arrive early to secure your seat. All members of the community are welcome to attend.

Office of the Presid
ent
Harvard University


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The state of Israel is trying to use “pinkwashing”—trumpeting its supposedly liberal, feminist and gay-friendly social atmosphere—to wipe away the stain of its military occupation and apartheid treatment of Palestinians. In so doing, apologists for Israel aim to draw away potential liberal supporters of the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement.

One of the Israeli government’s frequent strategies is to tour Israel Defense Force soldiers—with the aim of humanizing its occupation forces and, in this case, promoting its military as a beacon of gender equality. In response, the Campaign for BDS at Ohio State Campaign for BDS at Ohio State issued this statement.

We also came to understand how overt repression is buttressed by deceptive representations of the state of Israel as the most developed social democracy in the region. As feminists, we deplore the Israeli practice of “pinkwashing,” the state’s use of ostensible support for gender and sexual equality to dress up its occupation.
—From a report by a delegation of indigenous and women-of-color feminists after their visit to Palestine

Protesters take a stand against pinkwashing Israeli apartheid

Protesters take a stand against pinkwashing Israeli apartheid


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Nadia Kamil’s Feminist Burlesque Routine Is Both Deadly Serious And Utterly Hilarious (VIDEO)

A tip of the hat (and a twirl of the tassle) to comedian Nadia Kamil for this piece of live comedic joy: a feminist burlesque act.

It all kicks off around 1 min 45 seconds - but make sure you watch Kamil’s introduction to the routine, too.

We’re not sure burlesque - or feminism - has ever been so much fun…


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