Socialism Art Nature

Misogyny is an American problem, not an “isolated aberration.”

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Men are afraid women will laugh at them. Women are afraid men will kill them.
Margaret Atwood

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What we need is a war on misogyny. Not a racist “war on drugs” or imperialist “war on terror”. We have politicians and media pundits hashtaging for the rights of women in far away countries. What about the rights of women in this country? What about the right to live one’s life without being constantly in fear of rape or violence at the hands of misogynists like Elliot Rodgers? The right to live as an equal member of society in all matters economic, political, and social?

The fact is that men have killed more girlfriends/wives in the last 12 years in the US than the total number of Americans who were killed on 9/11, in Iraq and Afghanistan combined. Approximately 3 women in the U.S. are killed every 24 hours by a spouse or a known intimate. And nearly 1 in 5 women in the U.S. have been raped at some point in their lives.*

"Men’s rights" activists are the gender version of white supremacists. It is extremist hate masquerading as a "legitimate" political movement. And it is criminal for any political or media figure to describe these sexist hate-mongers as anything less than an unqualified danger to humanity.

* (http://socialismartnature.tumblr.com/post/45168393739/what-war-on-women; http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pdf/NISVS_Executive_Summary-a.pdf)

#YesAllWomen


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When 55 colleges in the U.S. — including many of the most prestigious and well-known — are simultaneously under investigation for essentially tolerating sexual assault on campus, you know that America has a serious MISOGYNY problem.

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Pregnant? Struggle with drug addiction? You will go to jail now in the state of Tennessee. How can this possibly be spun as being any good at all for the fetus, the future child, and/or most of all the pregnant person. This law will overwhelmingly effect only women, and is therefore utterly sexist. It is about controlling and criminalizing women and reproductive autonomy. It’s what happens when you combine gender oppression and mass incarceration.

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maybe it’s because our entire society treats sexual violence as ‘normal.’ from university administrators, army officers, police, judges, politicians, media figures, etc., etc.

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this guy needs to be taken off the airwaves like yesterday. he should literally only be allowed to share his views with those in earshot of him as he yells his inanities from a rocking chair on his front porch [like all other self-respecting crotchety old bigoted white men].

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Misogyny = terrorism.

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first Yale, then Harvard, now Columbia … America’s ivy league schools definitely have a massive rape problem. at least they are finally beginning to be held to account by former/current students and survivors.

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Students demand right to safety from sexual violence and access to mental health resources.

Trigger Warning: The following content discusses specific cases of sexual assault.

“I don’t trust the University to take my experience or my safety more seriously than they take their own public image.“– Cami Quarta, Columbia survivor and complainant


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THE STATE of Tennessee is about to establish a dangerous new precedent in the war on women.

Both houses of the state legislature recently passed SB 1391, a bill that would sanction women’s arrest and incarceration on the basis of the outcomes of their pregnancies. If Gov. Bill Haslam does not veto the measure, it would be the first law in the U.S. to criminalize pregnant women for the use of illegal or prescription drugs.

Supporters of reproductive rights are trying to pressure Haslam into stopping SB 1391 from becoming law.

Since the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion, hundreds of pregnant women have suffered unwanted medical interventions, arrests and incarcerations, based on a range of flimsy assertions about the health of their pregnancies—very often without legal or medical grounding for the claim that the women were responsible for harming a fetus or newborn.

National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW) compiled a groundbreaking report showing how these cases amount to what NAPW Executive Director Lynn Paltrow has termed the “New Jane Crow”—a reference to author Michelle Alexander’s best-selling book on racism and mass incarceration, The New Jim Crow.


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Sexual Assault at Brown University: Stand Up For Lena

On April 22, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Brown University students and Providence community members gathered in support of Lena Sclove. Here is her story.

We stand in solidarity with Lena Sclove and survivors at Brown University [content warning: rape, suffocation, battery]

During the evening of August 2, 2013, Brown University student, Lena Sclove, was raped and choked by a former friend, also a Brown University student. A Brown University Disciplinary Panel found that the reported rapist was responsible for four violations of the Brown University code of student conduct, including sexual misconduct involving one or more of the following: penetration, violent physical force, or injury. On October 18, 2013, Lena Sclove was informed that the reported rapist would be allowed to return to campus in less than a year; Fall, 2014. The reported rapist and his victim will be students in good standing at Brown University in the Fall of 2014. It is unfathomable and unacceptable that Lena Sclove will be forced to live in constant fear of her reported rapist while she completes her studies at Brown University, and Brown University will be called on to permanently bar the reported rapist from campus.

Contacts: Robert M. Hoatson, Ph.D., Road to Recovery, Inc. – 862-368-2800

Attorney Mitchell Garabedian, Boston, MA – 617-523-6250


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Why are hundreds of campuses now using the term “nonconsensual sex” instead of ‘rape’ or ‘assault’?

Nonconsensual sex is sexual assault. Several schools make that clear. In Princeton University’s policy, for example, next to the category “non-consensual sexual penetration,” it states in parentheses that the act is “commonly referred to as rape.” And next to “non-consensual sexual contact,” the act is “commonly referred to as sexual assault.”

… It’s rare for a college to seriously sanction a student who commits sexual assault. According to a 2010 investigation by the Center for Public Integrity, only 10 to 25 percent of students found “responsible” for sexual assault were permanently kicked off campus.

… For school hearing boards, the term “nonconsensual sex” has opened up a space for there to be sex that didn’t have affirmative consent, but isn’t assault exactly. There can be degrees of “rapiness,” with different punishments to match.

“Can a female student be a victim of nonconsensual sex and not rape? That’s a little bit horrifying,” said Rory Gerberg, a graduate student in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, who’s co-organizing a graduate school coalition to address Harvard’s sexual assault policy. “That is then perpetrating this notion that there is a different impact depending on the use of force.”


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Misogyny, USA.

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"Get the bitches in the right state of intoxication so the plows will be raining all over the place," read one of the fraternity-wide emails. "She had a friend who got raped in our house?" read another. "I would like to meet this lying cunt and show her how African men tread their women." In an unrelated email chain, another Epsilon Iota fraternity member lamented, "Something needs to be done so bitches will still go to our parties."

Last week, 70 pages of leaked emails and texts from Epsilon Iota’s listserv were sent anonymously to several students at American University. The trove and accompanying anonymous blog about the fraternity’s overall bastardry quickly went viral among students, faculty, and administration at the school, and by Friday had prompted a petition, a Facebook group, and an administration-launched inquiry.


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Editors’ Note: This is a first-person, present-tense account of the aftermath of a sexual assault that took place in 2013. For reasons of both style and substance, we have left it in present tense.

I’m writing this piece as I’m sitting in my own dining hall, only a few tables away from the guy who pressured me into sexual activity in his bedroom, one night last spring. My hands are trembling as they hover across the keyboard. I’m exhausted from fighting for myself. I’m exhausted from sending emails to my resident dean, to my House Master, to my Sexual Assault/Sexual Harassment tutors, to counselors from the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response, to my attorney. I’m exhausted from asking for extensions because of “personal issues.” I’m exhausted from avoiding the laundry room, the House library and the mailroom because I’m scared of who I will run into.

More than anything, I’m exhausted from living in the same House as the student who sexually assaulted me nine months ago.

I’ve spent most of 2013 fighting the Harvard administration so that they would move my assailant to a different House, and I have failed miserably. Several weeks ago, in a grey room on the fourth floor of the Holyoke Center, my psychiatrist officially diagnosed me with depression. I did not budge, and I was not surprised. I developed an anxiety disorder shortly after moving back to my House this fall, and running into my assailant up to five times a day certainly did not help my recovery.

“How about we increase your dose from 100 to 150 milligrams a day,” my psychiatrist said in a mechanical, indifferent voice. Sure thing.

This morning, as I swallowed my three blue pills of Sertraline and tried to forget about the nightmares that haunted my night, I finally admitted it to myself: I have lost my battle against this institution. Seven months after I reported what happened, my assailant still lives in my House. I am weeks behind in the three classes I’m taking. I have to take sleeping pills every night to fall and stay asleep, and I routinely get nightmares in which I am sexually assaulted in public. I cannot drink alcohol without starting to cry hysterically. I dropped my favorite extracurriculars because I cannot find the energy to drag myself out of bed. I do not care about my future anymore, because I don’t know who I am or what I care about or whether I will still be alive in a few years. I spend most of my time outside of class curled up in bed, crying, sleeping, or staring at the ceiling, occasionally wondering if I just heard my assailant’s voice in the staircase. Often, the cough syrup sitting in my drawer or the pavement several floors down from my window seem like reasonable options.

Dear Harvard: I am writing to let you know that I give up. I will be moving out of my House next semester, if only—quite literally—to save my life. You will no longer receive emails from me, asking for something to be done, pleading for someone to hear me, explaining how my grades are melting and how I have developed a mental illness as a result of your inaction. My assailant will remain unpunished, and life on this campus will continue its course as if nothing had happened. Today, Harvard, I am writing to let you know that you have won.

Read rest of article - http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2014/3/31/Harvard-sexual-assault/?page=1


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The “greatest army” in the “greatest nation on Earth” is a misogynistic hell-hole.

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