Socialism Art Nature




Disgusting image circulating among Israelis on social platforms: “Bibi [Netanyahu, Israeli PM], finish inside this time —Civilians for invasion”






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Another shocking reminder of the depravity of Israeli society. Rape culture meets Islamophobia meets colonialism meets genocide.
Disgusting image circulating among Israelis on social platforms: “Bibi [Netanyahu, Israeli PM], finish inside this time —Civilians for invasion”

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Another shocking reminder of the depravity of Israeli society. Rape culture meets Islamophobia meets colonialism meets genocide.

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Jessie Redmon Fauset (April 27, 1882 – April 30, 1961) was an African-American editor, poet, essayist and novelist. Fauset was the literary editor of the NAACP magazine The Crisis from 1919 to 1926. She also was the editor and co-author for the African-American children’s magazine The Brownies’ Book.  She studied the teachings and beliefs of W.E.B Du Bois and considered him to be her mentor. Fauset was known as one of the most intelligent women novelists of the Harlem Renaissance, earning her the name “the midwife”. In her lifetime she wrote four novels as well as poetry and short fiction.  As Crisis literary editor, Fauset fostered the careers of many of the most famous authors of the Harlem Renaissance, including Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, and Langston Hughes. In fact, Fauset was the first person to publish Hughes. In his memoir The Big Sea, Hughes calls Fauset the “midwife” of the Harlem Renaissance.

Jessie Redmon Fauset (April 27, 1882 – April 30, 1961) was an African-American editor, poet, essayist and novelist. Fauset was the literary editor of the NAACP magazine The Crisis from 1919 to 1926. She also was the editor and co-author for the African-American children’s magazine The Brownies’ Book.

She studied the teachings and beliefs of W.E.B Du Bois and considered him to be her mentor. Fauset was known as one of the most intelligent women novelists of the Harlem Renaissance, earning her the name “the midwife”. In her lifetime she wrote four novels as well as poetry and short fiction.

As Crisis literary editor, Fauset fostered the careers of many of the most famous authors of the Harlem Renaissance, including Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, and Langston Hughes. In fact, Fauset was the first person to publish Hughes. In his memoir The Big Sea, Hughes calls Fauset the “midwife” of the Harlem Renaissance.


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South Carolina Mother Jailed Because She Let Her 9-Year-Old Daughter Play in the Park Unsupervised
Here are the facts: Debra Harrell works at McDonald’s in North Augusta, South Carolina. For most of the summer, her daughter had stayed there with her, playing on a laptop that Harrell had scrounged up the money to purchase. (McDonald’s has free WiFi.) Sadly, the Harrell home was robbed and the laptop stolen, so the girl asked her mother if she could be dropped off at the park to play instead.
Harrell said yes. She gave her daughter a cell phone. The girl went to the park—a place so popular that at any given time there are about 40 kids frolicking—two days in a row. There were swings, a “splash pad,” and shade. On her third day at the park, an adult asked the girl where her mother was. At work, the daughter replied.
The shocked adult called the cops. Authorities declared the girl “abandoned” and proceeded to arrest the mother.
Direct source: http://www.wjbf.com/story/25915218/north-augusta-mother-charged-with-unlawful-conduct-towards-a-child

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The war on working class Black women in the U.S. continues apace. This time, a mother of a 9-year old child is arrested and jailed for the “crime” of dropping her daughter off at the park to play with other children while she had to go to work at a minimum wage job at McDonald’s (which fittingly happens to be located inside a WalMart).  Now the woman’s poor child is in the hands of the South Carolina state authorities [a state which STILL proudly flies the Confederate Flag at its Capitol building]. The irony is that the justification employed by state officials is that the mother put the child at risk by leaving her in the park where some random strangers might have just come along and kidnapped her child. As it turns out, that is exactly what happened, but the kidnappers were the police! They came along and snatched this woman’s child and now she risks losing her daughter forever!

South Carolina Mother Jailed Because She Let Her 9-Year-Old Daughter Play in the Park Unsupervised

Here are the facts: Debra Harrell works at McDonald’s in North Augusta, South Carolina. For most of the summer, her daughter had stayed there with her, playing on a laptop that Harrell had scrounged up the money to purchase. (McDonald’s has free WiFi.) Sadly, the Harrell home was robbed and the laptop stolen, so the girl asked her mother if she could be dropped off at the park to play instead.

Harrell said yes. She gave her daughter a cell phone. The girl went to the park—a place so popular that at any given time there are about 40 kids frolicking—two days in a row. There were swings, a “splash pad,” and shade. On her third day at the park, an adult asked the girl where her mother was. At work, the daughter replied.

The shocked adult called the cops. Authorities declared the girl “abandoned” and proceeded to arrest the mother.

Direct source: http://www.wjbf.com/story/25915218/north-augusta-mother-charged-with-unlawful-conduct-towards-a-child

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The war on working class Black women in the U.S. continues apace. This time, a mother of a 9-year old child is arrested and jailed for the “crime” of dropping her daughter off at the park to play with other children while she had to go to work at a minimum wage job at McDonald’s (which fittingly happens to be located inside a WalMart).

Now the woman’s poor child is in the hands of the South Carolina state authorities [a state which STILL proudly flies the Confederate Flag at its Capitol building].

The irony is that the justification employed by state officials is that the mother put the child at risk by leaving her in the park where some random strangers might have just come along and kidnapped her child. As it turns out, that is exactly what happened, but the kidnappers were the police! They came along and snatched this woman’s child and now she risks losing her daughter forever!


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Stand with Jada.

Stand with Jada.


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Today. Tuesday, July 8th. 5pm. City Hall Plaza, Boston.
https://www.facebook.com/events/341874052633263/

Today. Tuesday, July 8th. 5pm. City Hall Plaza, Boston.

https://www.facebook.com/events/341874052633263/


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How Fox News covered women’s issues this morning.


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Activist and freelance journalist Ben Norton reports from Washington, D.C., on a rally to highlight the impact of the U.S. injustice system on women and families.

"I HAVE the right to not be silent," a speaker declared, her amplified words projecting loudly and triumphantly from the Sylvan Theater, a stage directly adjacent to the Washington Monument.

The speaker, a formerly incarcerated mother, joined a wide array of people raising their voices at a June 21 Free Her rally against mass incarceration and the war on drugs in Washington, D.C.

In all, 30 people, from a variety of distinct backgrounds—ranging from formerly incarcerated mothers, to children and family members affected by mass incarceration, to feminist activists, to poets, to lawyers committed to social justice and more—took to the podium to share their stories and ideas. “Free our mothers, daughters, sisters, aunts, wives,” a speaker declared, speaking for the feelings of the impassioned crowd.

The turnout to the rally was inspiring. There were around 100 people present at any point in the event, with an estimated 300 coming through in total to learn and participate. Many brought chairs to listen for the whole four-hour event.

Discussions of mass incarceration and structural racism in the U.S. “justice” system tend to revolve around how much men of color—and in the age of the New Jim Crow, Black men in particular—are targeted by the racist “war on drugs.” This is certainly true, as any look at the victims of, for example, “stop and frisk” racial profiling or police violence show.

Free Her, however, took a perspective on mass incarceration not often heard: the effect of the prison-industrial complex on women, and their families.


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fuck racism, fuck misogyny, fuck transphobia

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IN WHAT could have been an article from the satirical website The Onion, right-wing Washington Post columnist George Will announced earlier this month that campus survivors of sexual assault are “privileged.”

Will’s article sparked immediate fury and outrage, including from rape survivors who wanted to know: What exactly are the “privileges” they now enjoy?

… FOR THOSE of us committed to combating sexual violence, the past few weeks have presented a snapshot of the world that can be confusing.

On the one hand, we have more ugly and blatant evidence of the victim-blaming and sexism that exists in mainstream politics and culture. Will’s column on campus sexual assault was followed by another horrendous Washington Post op-ed article suggesting that more marriage would end rape.

On the other hand, there has been a lot of evidence of people who are fed up by the dominant attitudes about sexual assault.

In the wake of the Isla Vista shootings, activists in Seattle, Portland and other cities took to the streets to bring #YesAllWomen into the streets for a public demonstration. When the men’s rights activist group A Voice for Men—which has a whole page on its website devoted to rape denial—announced plans to host a national conference in Detroit, activists launched a national petition and brought together a coalition of feminist, LGBTQ and labor groups to protest the conference—and won.

… None of this is a matter of coincidence. It is a result of how continued pressure has begun to shift the national conversation around sexual assault.

The thing about a conservative backlash is that it doesn’t work so well when our side outnumbers theirs. Since Will’s article came out, his official Facebook page has been essentially taken over by people horrified by his rape apologies and misogyny. Even his most recent articles, unrelated to rape apology, are swamped with comments from people fed up with his misogyny—including, it should be noted, self-described conservatives.

It was the explosion of SlutWalk demonstrations around the world, the well-organized campaigns against sexual violence on college campuses, the public outcry after the Steubenville, Ohio rape case and community cover-up and all the work of activists in between that has begun to shift the political terrain—and made this movement and its language impossible to ignore.


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Gender violence has reached “epidemic proportions,” according to a UN agency—but why is this happening now?

Nancy Welch is an activist in Vermont, English professor at the University of Vermont (UVM) and member of United Academics, the UVM faculty union. At a June 5 International Socialist Organization meeting, she spoke on a panel discussion on “American Misogyny: What’s Behind the War on Women?” Here, we print her speech, edited for publication.

 … Maybe I can sum up the sea change that occurred by pointing out that the late 1960s into the mid-1970s brought into U.S. living rooms at least half a dozen television shows featuring divorced women, single women and families headed by a woman alone; fast-forward to 1996, and we find fidelity-challenged President Bill Clinton signing into law the bill that repealed welfare, a bill that begins: “The Congress makes the following findings: (1) Marriage is the foundation of a successful society. (2) Marriage is an essential institution of a successful society which promotes the interests of children.”

That bill, replacing welfare supports with low-wage and no-rights workfare requirements, was not about turning back the clock to the brief period following the Second World War when working-class families had more means to fit into the breadwinning dad and stay-at-home mom mold.

Instead, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act was one among a growing number of measures designed to free corporations from paying taxes to support social programs. It was also designed to ensure that those same corporations would have plenty of cheap, disempowered, mostly female and disproportionately minority and immigrant workers, including for the growing low-wage industries of for-profit health care, elder care, child care and domestic services, which the curtailment of government programs helped launch.


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what a horribly socially-diseased society we live in …

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A study released in March 2013 by the American Psychological Association identified women aged 18–33 as the most stressed demographic in the US. In their coverage of the report, the Guardian noted, “Women in the survey reported feeling less valued than their male coworkers, less satisfied with their salaries, less likely to agree that their ‘employer provides sufficient opportunities for internal career advancement.’” The women polled in the study reported anxiety, sleep disorders, and alcohol abuse as consequences of unrelenting workplace pressure.

Jennifer Pan, “Pink Collar,” Jacobin 14.

 … And since chronic stress-related illness and injury is the leading cause of death in the U.S., it is fair to say that sexism kills …


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