Socialism Art Nature

Sign the petition at the link!

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ya heard? 
#FreePalestine
Over one million Palestinians displaced or murdered by Israel since 1948 …

ya heard?

#FreePalestine

Over one million Palestinians displaced or murdered by Israel since 1948 …


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In case anyone doubted that the police are a bunch of bigoted, barbaric, lynchings-waiting-to-happen.


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If you were outraged by the police murders of Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell, or any of the countless others, you need to be fucking outraged about this. This Black man was lynched in broad daylight by the NYC police. The cops are a terrorist organization, plain and simple. Sign the petition linked to in the article.

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Dr. George Tiller

Dr. George Tiller


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In my opinion, the right of oppressed people to be free from terrorism, violence, harassment, intimidation, and bullying, ALWAYS trumps “free speech” in such scenarios …

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 … I make no apologies for the fact that this piece is full of rage. When news of the murders broke, when the digital world began to absorb and discuss its meaning, I had been about to email my editor to request a few days off, because the impact of some particularly horrendous rape threats had left me shaken, and I needed time to collect my thoughts. Instead of taking that time, I am writing this blog, and I am doing so in rage and in grief - not just for the victims of the Isla Vista massacre, but for what is being lost everywhere as the language and ideology of the new misogyny continues to be excused. 

Why can we not speak about misogynist extremism - why can we not speak about misogyny at all - even when the language used by Elliot Rodger is everywhere online? 

We are told, repeatedly, to ignore it. It’s not real. It’s just “crazy”, lonely guys who we should feel sorry for. But as a mental health activist, I have no time for the language of emotional distress being used to excuse an atrocity, and as a compassionate person I am sick of being told to empathise with the perpetrators of violence any time I try to talk about the victims and survivors.

 … I know for sure that just by writing this I will have exposed myself to more harassment, more threats, more verbal assaults. The comments below this piece will be stuffed, as they always are, with rank sexism, along with by a few brave souls trying to counter their arguments or maintain some pretence at tolerant, adult debate. I have clear memories of a time when I really looked forward to engaging with people who commented on my blog, even when we disagreed, when online politics was an exciting, dynamic space of living conversation. I remember it, and it’s in the cache, so it must have happened. But many young women at the start of writing and digital careers today have no such memories.

We have been told for a long time that the best way to deal with this sort of harrassment and violence is to laugh it off. Women and girls and queer people have been told that online misogynists pose no real threat, even when they’re sharing intimate guides to how to destroy a woman’s self-esteem and force her into sexual submission. Well, now we have seen what the new ideology of misogyny looks like at its most extreme. We have seen incontrovertible evidence of real people being shot and killed in the name of that ideology, by a young man barely out of childhood himself who had been seduced into a disturbing cult of woman-hatred.


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On this day in 1985, the Pennsylvania State Police drop a bomb from a helicopter on the West Philadelphia headquarters of the Black liberation group MOVE, shooting victims as they tried to escape the blaze. The police bombing would kill 11 people including 5 young children and destroy over 65 homes. This is one chapter in the State’s long repression of MOVE, which includes the framing of journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal.

On this day in 1985, the Pennsylvania State Police drop a bomb from a helicopter on the West Philadelphia headquarters of the Black liberation group MOVE, shooting victims as they tried to escape the blaze. The police bombing would kill 11 people including 5 young children and destroy over 65 homes. This is one chapter in the State’s long repression of MOVE, which includes the framing of journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal.


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yeah, no. it doesn’t work to try to spin the growth of violent white-supremacist hate groups in the U.S. as something that is “good,” because it shows how insecure they feel about the approaching status of non-white Americans as comprising a majority of the population.

actually, this is based on the incorrect view that white supremacy and racism exist in the US because white people are the majority race, and since we live in a “democracy,” white people rule. but not only did white people become the majority by exterminating the Native population and controlling every move of the Black population; it is also the case that our society is ruled by a tiny elite minority who represent a fraction of the total white population. these elites no more care about the millions of white people living in poverty and homelessness, than they do about people of color. and these elites will ALWAYS depend upon extreme racist street-thugs like the KKK, etc., to maintain their hold on power through the age-old terror tactic of divide-and-conquer.

so, no, the growth of racist hate groups in the US is not a good thing and will [unfortunately] not be resolved by simply “outnumbering” white people demographically.

as always, we have to rip up the roots of an exploitative, oppressive system which by necessity breeds racism, oppression, and social enmity.

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As the Boston Marathon is run this year, the media will swell with coverage about last year’s deadly bombing. But for all the attention, many important issues weren’t confronted then—and they haven’t been since.

Khury Petersen-Smith attended the Marathon last year as a spectator. Along with SocialistWorker.org contributor Sofia Arias, he left the finish line are about an hour before the bombs went off. Their article about what they experienced was a powerful response to the tragedies that didn’t stop with the explosions. One year later, Petersen-Smith looks at the questions we still need to be asking today.

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… Over the past year, the media have rightly reported the stories of the many individuals who were at the Marathon finish line when the bombs exploded. We heard about heroism and unspeakable suffering.

But much of the other fallout from the attacks has been under-reported or altogether absent from the mainstream media. Amid the stories of stories of loss and trauma, and of decency and heroism, precious little has been said about the bitter experiences of Muslims in the aftermath of the bombing, nor the broader assault on civil liberties, carried out in the name of keeping us safe from violence and terrorism.

… One year later, we still face big tasks. Among them is establishing anti-racism and solidarity as the immediate response to crimes like this—and mounting a resistance to the increasingly repressive security state. We can’t allow our mourning of this catastrophe to be used for a further attack on our rights.


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these are the future terrorists who will be shooting up Jewish centers, Sikh temples, and Black teens wearing hoodies. and our society abets and abides their development.

Edit: someone just commented with the following insight -

“they don’t even have to be violent extremists tbqh..

“white people like this will be the future bosses who won’t hire us, cops who hunt us, parents who tell their kids to watch out for us, scared idiots who call the cops on us, internet commenters that stalk and harass us, hr people who ignore us when we place complaints, teachers who gleefully punish and restrict our learning, coworkers that harass us, and people who will vote to displace us, people who will gentrify us and leave us homeless, people who do not care if we live or die.

“you don’t need to be in the kkk or a terrorist hate group to be a violent racist.”

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Neo-Nazis roam the streets of America killing people; meanwhile police forces and the Feds are spying on Muslim Student Associations and Occupy activists.

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The mainstream media coverage of this year’s Boston Marathon is sure to remember the horror and fear of last year, when two explosions ripped through the crowd gathered at the finish line, killing three people and injuring more than 100. They will honor the heartening and courageous response of ordinary people—those who rushed toward the carnage to help the wounded and calm the panicked, those who opened their doors to anyone who wanted to gather, those who flocked to hospitals to donate blood.

But there’s another side to the Marathon bombings that won’t get the same coverage—the frantic and racist crackdown by authorities that reached a high point on April 19, when heavily armed law enforcement locked down Watertown, Mass., west of Boston during a manhunt for bombing suspects. Gabe Camacho is an activist and a resident of Watertown, who was caught in the lockdown. He talked to Sofia Arias about the horror and fear of another kind on the streets of Watertown that day.

 … I work for the American Friends Service Committee. I mostly do immigrant rights work in the U.S., but I also travel internationally as a human rights observer. I’ve been to war zones in Colombia and in Palestine. I know what occupation looks like. I know what a state of siege and a coup looks like. I’ve traveled quite extensively in Guatemala, including living in Santa Cruz del Quiché in Guatemala in 1979. I’ve been to Ecuador a week after the attempted coup against [President Rafael] Correa [in 2010].

So I know what these things look like. When I saw what was happening in my neighborhood, I really thought it was martial law. What I’d like to know is: First, why are our police becoming increasingly militarized? Second, how did they get this military hardware? Third, by what constitutional authority were we placed under house arrest for 18 hours?

I think everybody should be alarmed that this was a trial run for martial law. That’s exactly what I told my wife as these events transpired before our eyes—that this is a practice for martial law. This didn’t just come out of the blue. Somebody must have had plans. Somebody must have said, “Okay, we have the hardware, we have the army with us, we have the helicopters. Let’s try this out in Watertown. Let’s use going after the bombing suspect as an excuse to see how this works.”


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While law-abiding Muslims are forced to hide in their homes, and animal-rights activists are labeled as terrorists for undercover filming of abusive treatment at factory farms, right-wing hate groups are free to organize, parade, arm themselves to the hilt and murder with chilling regularity. It’s time for our society to confront this very real threat.
Amy Goodman, “The Grand American Tradition of Violent White Supremacy” | CommonDreams.org

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